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CHAPTER 11


There are a number of drugs that can be prescribed to help improve the symptoms of dementia and slow down the rate of deterioration. Organisations such as the Alzheimer’s Society run support services for sufferers and their carers, such as Memory Cafes, where they provide advice about simple ways of managing difficult symptoms that can come with dementia, like wandering and falls. GPs and nurses can help with this too. During the early days after diagnosis, it’s also important to make plans. This may include writing a Living Will which dictates what doctors may or may not do to you if your physical health deteriorates, or sorting out lasting power of attorney, where you appoint someone to make financial decisions on your behalf if you are no longer able to. There are also a handful of welfare benefits, such as attendance allowance and council tax exemption, which your Citizens Advice Bureau can offer advice on.


If you, or a loved one, starts ticking a number of these boxes, then visit your doctor.


Dementia is becoming more common as our population ages, but there is also more help available not only to reassure


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