Top gardening tips for June and beyond

Summer gardens are all about a riot of hot colours and vibrant blooms- perfect to admire with a chilled drink in hand. If you’ve questions about what to do in a garden in June and how to maintain your garden in summer, we answer to some of your most frequently asked questions.

 

What flowers bloom in summer?

For bright, dramatic enduring garden flowers that bloom in June and beyond, look wonderful in the summer sun, and also attract butterflies, bees and birds you can’t go wrong with:

  • Showstopping dahlia’s
  • Stately purple allium
  • Colourful zinnia
  • Pretty petunias
  • Classic English roses

How often should I water my garden in summer?

Of course it depends on the weather, but during hot and dry spells, water every couple of days – in milder weather a couple of times a week should suffice. Bear in mind pot plants may need more. It is generally better to water ‘deeply’ i.e. substantially and less often, than lightly but more often.

 

How often to water a vegetable garden in summer?


While the same rules apply to your vegetable patch as your flower garden, vegetables often need more water than other plants and flowers – the best way to ensure they are getting enough is to check the soil for moisture. You can even buy a probe to tell you if your soil is too dry. Prioritise watering seedlings and small plants with shallow root systems.

What garden vegetables to plant in June?


Perhaps surprisingly June is the perfect time to plant plenty of vegetables including beans – French, broad beans and runners as well as carrots, peas, sweet corn, cucumber and plenty of varieties of lettuce and salad leaves that should keep you in fresh salad all summer. It’s also a great time to plant a herb garden.

Should you feed garden birds in the summer?


Yes. Although food is more plentiful for birds in the summer months it is still a good idea to feed them – and their chicks. In spring and summer they need a higher protein diet to support them as they are busy rearing their young and when they moult. Sunflower seeds, oatmeal, soaked sultanas and soft fruit, mealworms, and seed mixes without peanuts (which can choke chicks) are all good options. Make sure you provide water if the weather is hot and dry    


 

Like this article?

You might also enjoy this one on how to attract birds to your garden, this one on balcony gardening  or Jane Perrone’s advice on cultivating indoor plantsAlternatively, to enjoy large and beautiful gardens without all the hard work, take a look at our retirement developments across the UK.

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